Small Arizona manufacturer solves a Power Stroke size problem

Small Arizona manufacturer innovates products for light duty pick-up trucks and creates a new product to increase the longevity of the 2017 and newer Powerstroke transmission.

Phoenix, United States - March 15, 2019 /PressCable/ —

In the Deer Valley area of north Phoenix resides “Strictly Diesel”, a service and repair facility performing their own R&D for new products that improve the performance and reliability of light duty diesel pickups.

According to Dennis “We come up with quality products that increase the life of these trucks and keep them out of the repair shop.” Nate agrees, and would add: “It has become our goal to find and address weaknesses the original equipment manufacturers did not foresee in their design process.”

The most recently addressed weakness is the OEM transmission cooling in 2017+ Ford 6.7L Power Stroke Diesel Super Duty pickups. These trucks were built to work, but on a warm summer day with a trailer in tow, the Ford 6.7L Power Stroke Diesel’s automatic transmission fluid can easily reach temperatures of over 230ºF. This is particularly true in dual rear wheel trucks with higher gear ratios, because of the elevated RPM. While it is true that lubricants have improved over the years, many owners and technicians that maintain these trucks are not comfortable with extended operation at such high temperatures. To solve this problem, the Strictly Diesel team developed “The Driven Diesel 6.7L Transmission Cooler Kit”.

This kit features a large liquid-to-air heat exchanger that operates in series with the OEM liquid-to-liquid unit. This maintains the OEM cooler’s ability to aid in warming the transmission upon a cold start while offering a significant reduction in maximum transmission temperatures. According to Dennis “After looking the entire transmission cooling system over thoroughly for possible causes, we determined that the OEM transmission cooler just wasn’t large enough to properly cool the fluid under extended load situations. This new product in conjunction with the OEM Transmission cooler, achieved the results we were looking for.”

The Driven Diesel kit features an OEM grade heat exchanger that was able to bring temperatures down 20-30ºF under significant load, with sustained cruising temperatures dropping 30-40ºF. The kit also includes Gates® transmission cooler hose, T-304 Stainless steel brackets, and OEM style hardware, for a factory appearing installation.

The entire Strictly Diesel team is very proud of their transmission cooler kit, and the demand for the product is keeping them at the top of their industry as an innovator in diesel performance.

Contact Info:
Name: Dennis Schroeder
Email: Send Email
Organization: Strictly Diesel
Address: 2215 W Parkside Ln, Phoenix, AZ 85027, United States
Phone: +1-623-582-4404
Website: https://www.strictlydiesel.com

Source: PressCable

Release ID: 492591

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