The Latest: Oklahoma City bombing Survivor Tree DNA lives on

FILE - In this April 19, 2010 file photo, people gather under the Survivor Tree at the Oklahoma City National Memorial during a ceremony marking the 15th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing. As part of the city's annual day of remembrance Friday, April 19, 2019 – the 24th anniversary of the attack – civic leaders will plant a tree in a city park that was cloned from this scarred American elm that survived the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

Science is helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA of a tree symbolizing hope 24 years after the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil

OKLAHOMA CITY — The Latest on efforts to sustain a tree symbolizing hope following the Oklahoma City bombing (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA of a tree symbolizing hope 24 years after the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil.

As part of an annual remembrance of the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing, civic leaders transplanted a young tree Friday that was cloned from a scarred American elm that lived through the blast. They hope the cloned elm will replace the nearly 100-year-old "Survivor Tree" once it dies.

The parent tree lives on at the memorial to the 168 people killed.

Oklahoma forester Mark Bays says the genetically identical clone will grow taller and spread roots. Machinery that can move a mass of roots 25 feet (7.6 meters) across can haul it to the memorial when needed.

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11:15 p.m.

Oklahoma City is using science and technology to sustain the DNA and spirit of a tree symbolizing hope 24 years after the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil.

As part of an annual remembrance of the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing, civic leaders on Friday plan to transplant a tree that was cloned from a scarred American elm that lived through the blast. They hope the younger elm will replace the nearly 100-year-old "Survivor Tree" once it dies.

The parent tree lives on at the memorial to the 168 people killed.

Oklahoma forester Mark Bays says the genetically identical clone will grow taller and spread roots. Machinery that can move a mass of roots 25 feet (7.6 meters) across can haul it to the memorial when needed.

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